Crowdfunded Energy Storage: Circuitree Cirrus with Saltwater Batteries

by Claire Juozitis on February 23, 2017 at 2:54 PM

Integrated energy storage systems are the popular new toys on the market. 

These plug-and-play, standalone systems combine the various components of an energy storage system (batteries, inverters, controllers, etc.), making it easier for small businesses and homeowners to hit the ground running with solar energy storage. Our partners Sentinel Solar in North America and Fusion Power Systems in Australia have developed these kinds of solutions using our saltwater batteries, and so far they’ve been a hit.

Now, another smart battery solution is being developed to power homes in the United Kingdom, but with an interesting angle: it’s crowdfunded!

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Top 5 Considerations When Choosing a Telecom Battery

by Matt Maroon on February 21, 2017 at 4:54 PM

With continued worldwide growth in cell phone subscribers, data usage, and network upgrades, the need for reliable power throughout the telecommunications network has never been more crucial.  

There are several layers that provide this reliable power - the traditional utility grid, generators, renewables, and batteries.  Even in the most reliable grid installations, batteries are a fundamental element of the ‘belt-and-suspenders’ approach to ensuring 100% uptime for tower owners and operators.  For weak-grid sites, batteries are indispensable for providing power to bridge during times when the grid is unavailable.  And in full off-grid installations, batteries are the key to enabling reliability and the lowest operating expenses.

While specific battery bank sizing will vary in these three scenarios (on-grid, weak-grid, off-grid), there are still some common attributes that are high on the wish list of tower operators, owners, and energy service companies.

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New Solar Battery Safety Policies for Australian Homeowners

by Aquion Team Member on February 17, 2017 at 12:17 PM

The possibility of new regulations restricting lithium-ion battery installation in Australian homes could have a major impact on the energy storage industry.

Safety concerns surrounding lithium-ion batteries have inspired a variety of policy initiatives restricting their usage in homes or densely populated cities.  For instance, in November, New York City’s fire department and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) convened to address the very real concern about lithium-ion-related fires in New York City and commissioned a study on how to handle potentially flammable storage systems in an already complex and outdated New York City grid.  Perhaps piggybacking off that initiative, the issue has once again become a hot topic - this time in Australia as officials with Standards Australia are proposing tough new rules for the installation of lithium ion batteries in homes.

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In the News: January 2017 Highlights

by Claire Juozitis on February 14, 2017 at 4:27 PM

AQUION ENERGY IN THE NEWS

We started off the new year the right way! January was packed with awards, partnerships, projects, and even our big debut on the small screen. Take a look at our top blog posts and press releases, as well as what the world had to say about Aquion as we began 2017.

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Partial State of Charge and Solar Telecom Batteries

by Terry Holtz on February 12, 2017 at 3:00 PM

In off-grid telecom sites with energy storage, the solar batteries are usually sitting at a partial state of charge, meaning they are not fully charged, nor fully discharged.

Solar-powered telecom towers commonly have lead acid batteries for their energy storage systems. However, operating or even sitting idle at a partial state of charge is problematic for lead-acid batteries.  As lead acid batteries discharge, the active materials transform from lead to lead sulfate - it is this chemical reaction that provides the requested power.  

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